Project/Icons / advocateProject/Icons / educateProject/Icons / healthIcons/moneyIcons/moneyx2Icons/Ionic/Social/social-pinterestProject/Icons / protectProject/Icons / supportProject/Icons / volunteerProject/Icons / water
Donate

Australia

Save the Children runs education and child protection programs in urban, regional and remote locations right around Australia. We are dedicated to supporting Australian children to reach their full potential.

Why we work in Australia

Australia has been ranked among the best places to live in the world for education, economic advantage and life expectancy1. But this opportunity doesn't translate for everyone.

More than 17% of Australian children still fall below the poverty line2. Surprisingly, many children don't have access to the basics of quality education and healthcare. There is an over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in the juvenile justice system and institutional care. And there are not enough protection services for children and mothers who are experiencing family violence and abuse.

These inequalities can be true for children from all backgrounds. Yet it's migrant and refugee children who are often more marginalised than other Australian children because of social and language barriers. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children can also be more likely to miss out on the same opportunities as other children, especially in communities still healing from a legacy of colonisation, the Stolen Generation and cultural disconnection.

Save the Children's work in Australia

Save the Children runs education and child protection programs in urban, regional and remote locations right around Australia. Regardless of where they live or their background, we are dedicated to supporting Australian children to reach their full potential.

Dumaji child & family centre

As part of its youth development and family support programs, the Dumaji Child and Family Centre, in remote far north Queensland, run a camp for local children and their families. Late last year, the camp took place at Adel’s Grove in Lawn Hill National Park – or Boodjamulla.

This camp is part of the Connected Beginnings and Ready Together programs; bringing families together, building social and emotional skills and encouraging new friendships in preparation for school. It also provides an opportunity for young families to relax, interact and share quality time with each other. But above all, this camp is about connecting the children with their country and their culture.

Partnering with young people, families and communities

We offer support to struggling parents and give their young children the stimulation they need for healthy development through our supported play program. We create new pathways for young people who are struggling to stay in school or are having difficulty transitioning out of the juvenile justice system. We protect mothers and children who are experiencing family or domestic violence in safe houses across Australia. We care for pregnant or new mothers in supported accommodation, helping them to gain confidence in caring for their babies.

We work in partnership with young people and other agencies to ensure our programs are effective, targeted and evidence-based. And we are committed to reconciliation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Our Reconciliation Action Plan promotes reconciliation through partnerships, mutual respect, understanding and dialogue, so the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children can be realised.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have been the custodians of the land now called Australia for more than 50,000 years. Today there are more than 500 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nations and 150 surviving languages, 13 of which are still strong.

It's true that Australia has the best beaches, unique wildlife and beautiful birds. The bush and the outback are an important part of life and identity. But it's Australia's cultural heritage and people that make it such a special place.

The waves of migrants and refugees that have arrived over the years have all brought something of their own to integrate into Australia's way of life. Today, almost one-in-four Australian residents were born in other countries, making Australia rich in language, customs and culture.


1 'Human Development Report', 2016.
​2 'Poverty in Australia', 2016.